Bishop Dunne offers a rigorous college preparatory curriculum in a nurturing and supportive environment with exceptional teachers. Prior to course selection, students will consult with their counselors concerning curriculum choices, strands, and requirements.

High School Course Offerings

Art

610 Introduction to Art

Semester course. Intro to Art is an introductory studio drawing course with emphasis on developing basic drawing skills and fundamental design and composition concepts. In addition to technical skills, an exploration of creative thinking, problem solving, and critical analysis will be studied. Students will be encouraged to develop an expression of individual style. Intro Art is a prerequisite for all other studio art courses.

611 Drawing and Painting

Prerequisite: Intro Art. Semester course. Drawing and Painting is an intermediate studio drawing and introductory painting course. Students will continue development of drawing skills and design principles learned in Art I, and will be introduced to painting tools and techniques. Color theory will be an integral part of the course studies and projects. Students will be encouraged to develop an expression of individual style.

612 Design

Prerequisite: Intro to Art. Semester course. Design is an introductory design course for advanced and serious art students. Students will explore both two-dimensional and three-dimensional design. Students will study both elements and principles of design and apply them. Artists and artistic movements will be introduced with a focus on Modern, Post-Modern, and Contemporary art. Students will be encouraged to develop an expression of individual style.

613 Advanced Painting

Prerequisite: Intro Art and Drawing and Painting. Semester course. Advanced Painting is a course for students who would like to continue to develop their painting skills. Further emphasis will be placed on color theory and composition. Students will be encouraged to develop an expression of individual style.

614 Ceramics I

Prerequisite: Intro Art. Semester course. Ceramics 1 is an introductory sculpture course with emphasis on clay. Students will explore three-dimensional design principles such as how objects interact in space, and various techniques such as additive and reductive methods, hand building, and pottery wheel use. Students will be encouraged to develop an expression of individual style.

615 Ceramics 2

Prerequisite: Ceramics 1. Semester course. Ceramics 2 is an intermediate ceramics course. Students will continue their development of sculptural skills and knowledge learned in Art V. Further exploration of advanced hand building techniques and pottery wheel throwing will be emphasized, along with an introduction to kiln use. Students will be encouraged to develop an expression of individual style.

616 Photography 1

Prerequisite: Intro to Art. Semester course. Photo 1 is an introductory digital photography course. Students will explore basic photography techniques, including an understanding of camera mechanics, digital manipulation, digital darkroom techniques, and design and composition concepts. Students will be encouraged to develop an expression of individual style. This course counts toward Fine Art OR Technology credit. This is a sophomore, junior, and senior level course.

617 Photography 2

Prerequisite: Photo 1. Semester course. Photo 2 is an intermediate photography course. Students will continue the development of digital photography and Photoshop skills learned in Art VII with an in-depth look at advanced photography techniques and design concepts. Students will be encouraged to develop an expression of individual style. This course counts toward Fine Art OR Technology credit. This is a sophomore, junior, and senior level course.

627 Independent Art

Prerequisite: Ceramics 2, Photo 2, Advanced Painting, or Graphic Design 2. Requires instructor approval. Semester or year-long course. Independent Art in art is an advanced studio course focusing on the independent study of media specified by individual student interest with instructor approval. Students may choose work in a variety of areas including photography, ceramics, sculpture, mixed media, drawing, or painting. Emphasis will be on development of skills, understanding of art theory and concepts, creation of portfolio, and preparation for college art courses. Independent study students will meet at the same time and use the same studio space as introductory and intermediate students.

628 Studio Art AP

Prerequisite: Ceramics 2, Photo 2, Advanced Painting, or Graphic Design 2. Requires instructor approval. Year-long course. Studio Art AP is a year-long advanced studio course focusing on three major areas: a sense of quality in artwork, a concentration on a particular visual interest or problem, and the need for breadth of experience in formal, technical, and expressive means. The course is intended for highly motivated students who are seriously interested in the study of art. All students will submit a complete portfolio in May. Summer assignment required.

Athletics and Wellness

418 Adventure/Outdoor Education – Archery and GPS

Semester Course. This course is open to grades 9-12 to introduce students to the activities of competition archery and the use of a GPS for hiking and other practical uses. Particular attention will be paid to the technical skills, rules, safety procedures and equipment for both sports. Students will also develop muscular strength, flexibility and endurance related to these sports. Emphasis is placed on promoting respect for the environment and physical activity so these sports can be enjoyed for a lifetime. Important topics that will be taught in the course include: NASP 11 steps archery program, 3D field targeting, yoga, geocaching, orienteering, search and rescue techniques, field data collection, GIS, and nature conservation. Class size is limited to 18 for safety concerns on GPS field trips and on the archery shooting range. Although not a prerequisite, priority will be given to members of the archery team or students who have taken the GIS class.

423 Health

Semester Course. This course is designed to assist individuals in analyzing health problems in their own school-community situation with a view toward working out a well-coordinated health program to meet school and community needs. This course covers general physical, mental, and social health areas.

426 Strength, Conditioning, and Nutrition

Prerequisite: Grades 9-12. Semester Course. This course focuses on the different aspects and processes in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Students will learn about the dietary needs of the human body and healthy eating. The students will learn the benefits of a fitness routine, ranging from weights to cardiovascular exercise to movement exercises such as yoga and Pilates. The course will combine theory and practice, so the informed student will have the tools to pursue a healthier lifestyle.

427 Yoga I

Fall Semester. Yoga is a form of exercise that gets one in tune with the body’s muscles, improves posture, expands breathing capabilities and aids in physical and mental well-being. Focused in developing strength, balance and flexibility, the semester-long course will help increase concentration levels and vitality as well as decrease stress and improve mental clarity. This class is geared towards beginners.

434 Yoga II

Spring Semester. This course is a continuation of the physical development through yoga course with a focus on asana flow and an increased pace. Basic Hatha yoga postures are combined with body strengthening, relaxation, and breathing techniques.

450 Girls’ Volleyball

Spring Semester. This course is intended for volleyball players. In this course, players will drill in the skill components of volleyball (passing, setting, attacking, serving), and learn multiple systems of transition, defense, and serve receive. Players will also learn the various positions and the responsibilities of each position. Players will also be introduced to volleyball theory, strategy, and leadership responsibilities. Players will be tested in skills, positional responsibilities, system responsibilities, and transitional responsibilities. Players will also learn conditioning that is volleyball specific, from strength training to plyometrics. Players will be measured and tested on physical progress from running times to vertical jumping heights.

451 Girls’ Basketball

Fall Semester. This course is open to all girls who participate as part of the JV and Varsity Bishop Dunne girls’ basketball teams. The course includes basketball practices and learning the techniques of team basketball along with a rigorous strength and conditioning program.

452 Girls’ and Boys’ Track

Spring Semester. Technique, strength, flexibility, endurance, speed, and mental concentration will be covered in this course. Workouts will consist of a conditioning period, training period, and an in-season training period. As the student progresses to the in-season period, the workouts will increase in intensity while the duration decreases. For boys and girls grades 9-12, students must attend scheduled practices and events outside of athletic period. In order to qualify for meets, minimum time and distance standards must be met.

453 JV/V Boys’ Basketball

Fall Semester. This course is open to sophomore, junior and/or senior boys who participate as part of the JV or Varsity Bishop Dunne boys’ basketball teams. The course includes basketball practices and learning the techniques of team basketball along with a rigorous strength and conditioning program.

454 Football

Fall Semester. This course is open to all high school students who want to participate in football at Bishop Dunne Catholic School. Boys attend scheduled practice that is not during class time, as set by the instructor. The course includes practices and learning techniques of football, along with a rigorous off season conditioning program.

455 Girls’ and Boys’ Wrestling

Fall Semester. This course is open to all high school grade levels who wish to participate in wrestling at Bishop Dunne Catholic School. The course includes practices, tournaments, matches, strength and conditioning training, and techniques. Students must attend scheduled practices, tournaments, and matches that are not during class time, as set by the instructor.

456 Freshmen Boys’ Basketball

Fall Semester. This course should be taken by all freshmen planning to participate in basketball at Bishop Dunne Catholic School, schedule permitting. This course includes practices and learning fundamentals and techniques of team basketball along with a pre-season conditioning program.

457 Baseball

Fall Semester. This course is open to all freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors who wish to participate in baseball at Bishop Dunne Catholic School. The course includes practices and learning the techniques of baseball along with rigorous training. Students must attend all practices that are not during class time, as set by the instructor.

458 Boys’ Soccer

Spring Semester. This course is open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to participate in soccer. The soccer academic period is divided into three areas of focus. The course will focus on developing muscular strength to meet the demands of playing competitive high school soccer. During the off-season, participants will move through several phases of weight training designed to achieve specific gains in muscular strength and endurance. While in season, participants will shift to a weight program designed to maintain gains in muscular strength and endurance. Aerobic conditioning is the second focus of the athletic period. Participants will move through several phases of aerobic conditioning, with the goals of improving recovery time from anaerobic exertion and increasing the efficiency of lactic acid removal. The final focus of the soccer athletic period is on increasing game awareness. Participants will be educated in the strategy and tactics of Bishop Dunne’s playing system. Within each focus, specific benchmarks will be set, and participants’ progress will be assessed at regular intervals.

459 Softball

Spring Semester. This course is open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to participate in softball at Bishop Dunne Catholic School. Students must attend scheduled practices not during class time, as set by the instructor. The course includes practices and learning techniques of softball along with a rigorous off-season conditioning program.

461 Drill Team

Fall Semester. This course is designed for current 7-12th graders who are chosen from May tryouts. The course consists of major grade performances at football and basketball game performances and self-choreographed routines. Quiz grades consist of knowledge of routine and dance styles. Lastly, daily grades are taken for class participation, appropriate dress, conditioning, attitude, and leadership.

462 Cheerleading

Fall Semester. This course is for students who are cheerleaders at Bishop Dunne. The course consists of weekly game preparation, weekly performance reviews, preparation and review of pep rallies, leadership, positive attitude, school spirit, appearance during performances, conditioning, and tumbling. Students are required to perform at all football games, basketball games, pep rallies, parades, competitions, and fundraising activities. They will be required to create dance and cheer routines.

466 Girls’ Soccer

Fall Semester. All girls who wish to play soccer for Bishop Dunne Catholic School should be enrolled in this class. The soccer athletic period will provide game experience and create a high level of physical fitness for the season as well as give players the tactical knowledge to be competitive. Students will receive instruction in the following areas: physical fitness and well-being, individual skills, team skills, soccer strategy, soccer techniques (including goalkeeping), and rules of the game. The greatest focus will be on building team dynamics and tactical awareness. Students must attend scheduled practices and matches that are not during class time, as set by the instructor.

609 Dance I

Semester Course. Dance I is an introduction to contemporary, lyrical, hip hop, jazz, and modern dance technique. Students will learn conditioning exercises, basic dance warm ups and stretches, and perform lyrical and jazz combinations as a class. Students will also learn dance terminology, choreography, and history.

English

012 English I

English I is a general introduction to the study of fiction, drama, poetry, and nonfiction. Composition will include reviewing the writing of effective sentences, the building of these sentences into paragraphs, and the writing of essays in addition to the introduction and completion of writing a research paper. Appropriate use of grammar is stressed through writing and exercises, and development of vocabulary skills is ongoing. Summer reading assignments are required.

896 Seminar Freshman Connections

Year-long course. Seminar is designed as a supplement to freshman classes. The course encourages students to develop good study skills while strengthening fundamentals. Students identify their personal learning styles; practice study techniques geared to those styles, and apply those skills to all their coursework. While providing a study hall opportunity for students to complete assignments, the class also acts as an extension of each class. This class also serves as an adjunct to allow students new to the school to become acquainted with or maintain the rigorous curriculum through in-class one-on-one and group support structured around specific assignments.

051 Speech

Semester course. This course will give the student the tools to become a more effective communicator and public speaker. Through extensive practice and self-reflection, students will develop poise and confidence in all social situations. Students will learn how to use voice, tone, eye contact and facial expressions to convey their thoughts and emotions. They will receive extensive practice with these techniques through mock interviews, improvisational and prepared speeches. By the end of the semester students will feel more comfortable and confident in their ability to communicate a message to both small and large groups.

024 (9th), 025 (10th), 026 (11th) Expository Writing

Prerequisite: departmental approval. The Expository Writing class is designed to prepare selected students for the rigorous writing requirements of high school in a smaller, more specialized setting. Emphasis placed on the writing process includes grammar and syntax, topic selection, thesis development, thesis support, embedding, parenthetical documentation, MLA format and citation, editing, and proofreading. Upon completion of the class students will be expected to produce unified, coherent, and well developed essays and research papers that meet the requirements of the Bishop Dunne English department.

013 English I (Pre-AP)

Prerequisite: departmental approval. English I (Pre-AP) covers all literary genres and their essential literary terms as well as a study of the works of such classical authors as Homer, Sophocles, Shakespeare, and Dickens. Contemporary works are included, and various writing assignments will correlate with these works of literature, thus developing the skills of paragraph and composition construction, culminating in the completion of a research paper. Grammar skills are assumed and development of vocabulary skills is ongoing. Summer reading assignments are required.

022 English II

The focus of English II is centered on important literary works, both ancient and modern, from the six major cultures. The diverse selections from a variety of genres are studied in their historical and geographic contexts. In addition to focusing on reading comprehension, students will continue to develop their writing skills through analytical writing activities and a research project. Ongoing development of grammar and vocabulary skills is also emphasized. Summer reading assignments are required.

023 English II (Pre-AP)

Prerequisite: English I (or I Pre-AP) and departmental approval. English II (Pre-AP) is designed to aid the serious English student in the development of the analytical and writing skills necessary for further English AP coursework. The content of this class is the same as the 022 English II however more extensive reading selections will be required. Grammar skills are assumed and the development of vocabulary skills is ongoing. Summer reading assignments are required.

032 English III

English III is an American literature survey course presented in an historical perspective and context beginning with the origins of America and ending with the contemporary period. Students are introduced to the evolving themes and styles of American literature and given opportunities to read, analyze and discuss various prose selections, poetry, drama, and novels. Students will continue to develop critical thinking skills and improve writing skills with a variety of assignments. Grammar will be reviewed on a regular basis and the development of vocabulary skills will be ongoing. Students will practice these skills in a variety of writing assignments leading up to and including the research process in preparation for the required research paper. Summer reading assignments are required.

033 English III Language and Composition AP

Prerequisite: English II (or Pre-AP II) and departmental approval. An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing (taken from www.collegeboard.com).

As this is a college-level course, expectations are appropriately high, and the workload is challenging. Often, work involves long-term writing and reading assignments, so effective time management is important. Because of the demanding curriculum, students must bring to the course sufficient command of mechanical conventions and an ability to read and discuss prose. Summer reading assignments are required.

034 Introduction to Creative Writing

Prerequisite: successful completion of ENG I and ENG II with a grade of 80 or higher. This course is an introduction to the art and craft of creative writing. The class will focus on reading and writing in the context of poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. In each genre, students will study and apply forms, techniques and literary elements of creative writing. The student will receive a full workshop experience which provides an opportunity for analyzing and critiquing student writing. The class will work together to help each student grasp personal subject matter, style, voice and which genre each student prefers. The class will read short pieces by poets and writers that will launch large group discussions about voice, form, language, plot and other literary elements. These readings, peer support, and individualized assignments will help the student develop a collection of polished pieces that will be submitted to literary journals and magazines.

035 Advanced Creative Writing

Prerequisite: successful completion of Creative Writing with a grade of 75 or higher. Advanced Creative Writing is an extension of what the student has learned in Intro to Creative Writing. This course allows students to gain further practice in a particular genre (chosen by the student). The primary focus of this course is for students to generate a sustained, polished piece of writing suitable for publication. This work should demonstrate an advanced level of knowledge of the elements necessary for the particular genre, a control of language, and craftsmanship, as well as a thorough understanding of the workshop and revision process. The student will also learn how to compose a proposal and send that proposal to agents and publishers.

042 English IV

English IV is a survey course of British literature presented in a historical perspective and context beginning with the Anglo-Saxon period and ending with the contemporary period. Students will be introduced to the evolving themes and styles of British literature and given opportunities to read, analyze and discuss prose, poetry and drama. Students will continue to develop critical thinking skills and improve writing skills with a variety of assignments which include the acquisition of vocabulary. Grammar will be reviewed on a regular basis and students will be expected to apply correct grammar to their writing. Students will develop logic in argumentative essays and review the research process in preparation for the required research paper. Summer reading assignments are required.

043 English IV AP

Prerequisite: previous teacher recommendation and instructor approval. While providing excellent preparation for any college English course, AP English IV more specifically prepares the student for the English Literature Advanced Placement exam by engaging in both close reading and critical analysis of world literature in fiction and poetry. Through careful study, students will consider a number of literary elements of a particular work, including, but not limited to, structure, style, imagery, and theme. Required of the student are intensive reading, writing, tutorial participation, and other studies, however class time consists mostly of analysis and discussion. The Advanced Placement test in Literature and Composition is recommended but not required. There will be a practice test in the spring which will help students make this decision. Prior to the commencement of the academic year, summer reading assignments are required.

Music and Theater

20 Beginner Band (Band Fundamentals)

Band Fundamentals is a course designed for students with little or no musical training or those who are learning how to play a different band instrument. Musical studies will include basic tone production and percussion rudiments, reading music notation and basic music theory, and performing in a group setting. Students playing the flute, clarinet, alto sax, trumpet, and guitar must provide their own instrument in good playing condition. Percussion students will learn playing techniques of the entire percussion section (drumline, mallets, and timpani). Percussion students must supply their own sticks and mallets. Larger woodwind and brass instruments as well as the larger percussion instruments, when available, will be provided by the music department. Performances may include the winter band concert, spring band concert, and other programs.

633 Choir

Semester Course. Choir is an introduction to music course designed to develop basic singing techniques, sight-reading skills, and music theory concepts. Students will perform at various important school functions throughout the year.

642 Intermediate Band

Prerequisite: Band Fundamentals Class or at least one year playing experience. Intermediate Band is a course designed for those students with at least one year’s playing experience on a band instrument who would like to increase their musical training and abilities before enrollment in the high school marching or concert band. Increased studies will cover musical material needed for success in the high school bands. Performances may include concerts in the fall and spring semesters. Students must have their own instrument. Percussionists must supply their own sticks and mallets.

643 Percussion

This class will provide additional education in the field of percussion. Students will have the opportunity to study ensemble repertoire, technique on all orchestral instruments, Afro-Latin hand drumming, jazz, and contemporary drum set studies, historical and theoretical aspects of music, and the contemporary practices in live music performance. The percussion students will have a better understanding of their roles in marching band, concert band, and percussion ensembles. Each student will learn more about musicianship, the role of the percussionist, sight-reading, advanced rudimentary training, and instrument care.

644 Introduction to Music Theory

This class is designed to give the student a basic understanding of the concepts of music theory. Topics covered will be notation, scales, modes, keys, tonalities, melodic structures, harmonic structures, melodic organization, voice leading, analysis, and harmonic progressions. The course also includes an aural component of listening and sight-reading/singing.

645 Concert/Marching Band

Marching band is a year-long course designed for students who have had at least two continuous years on their major band instrument. The marching band travels with the football team to all games, performs in the stands, marches on the field at half-time, and performs in pep rallies. Other performances may include Open House, winter band concert, and parades. Students must be able to march and perform at out-of-school events. The concert band is also designed for students who have had at least two continuous years on their major band instrument. Performances may include the spring band concert, several music festivals, and graduation. This group travels periodically for performances. Fundraising activity participation is encouraged for students in this course. Students must have own instrument.

654 Beginning Strings

This course is for the student who wishes to begin and learn one of the four orchestral string instruments (violin, viola, cello, or string bass). Students will learn how to read music, basic musicianship concepts, and how to play their string instrument. No previous musical experience is necessary. The class will also perform as a string ensemble at the Christmas and/or spring concert(s). Students must rent or own their own instrument.

656 Advanced Strings

Semester Course. This course is for students who have taken beginning strings or have at least a year of playing experience on violin, viola, cello, or string bass. This course will explore advanced string playing techniques as well as more difficult string music. Students in this course will play in the symphony orchestra as well as at the Christmas and spring concerts. Students must rent or own their own instrument.

672 Applied Percussion

Applied study within the Bishop Dunne percussion department refers to weekly private lessons with Mr. Fajardo and a weekly studio class that together serve as the cornerstone of our students’ percussion education. During the course of study, students will be able to choose to study snare drum, timpani, keyboard percussion, drum set, hand drums, and percussion accessories. Students are graded on one mid-term technique exam and present a music jury performance as their final.

690 Music History

Semester Course. This class is a survey of music from the ancient world to the 2000 era. Representative masterpieces of music are explored, focusing on the monumental genres that created pivotal shifts in culture. Nontechnical discussions of music, as well as the times and lives of the composers, are presented to enhance the enjoyment of listening experience for musicians and non-musicians.

Theater Course Listing

651 Theater I: Acting

Semester Course. Theater I: Acting introduces students to mime, improv, storytelling, and stage acting. This course also has a capstone project on a Shakespeare play where students select a play, perform a monologue from it, and teach the class about the play.

652 Theater II: Theater History

Prerequisite: Theater Arts I. Semester Course. Theater II: Theater History follows the chronological development of Western theater, from the Greeks to playwrights of the Modern Era. Performance projects accompany each period of theater history, emphasizing different skills such as improvisation, character acting, and dance.

662 Theater Production

Prerequisite: Audition. Semester Course. Theatre Production is an immersion course for students who have been approved and cast in the fall or spring productions. This course is for actors and supporting members of the cast. Students learn blocking, characterization, acting techniques, time management and team building. Students produce a full main stage production.

674 Theater III: Theatrical Production

Prerequisite: Theater I and Theater II. Students learn the basics of playwriting, directing, designing and managing a production. The course ends in a capstone collaborative project of a brand new play, performed, directed, and designed by the students.

675 Theater IV: Theater Seminar

Prerequisite: Theater I, Theater II, and Theater III. Students select advanced projects for completion in a field of theater. Course contains one capstone paper and project accompanying their inquiry into their field of choice -- examples include: developing audition pieces, writing a full play, designing a full show, stage managing a production, academic research into a playwright, play, or genre.

Mathematics

112 Algebra I

Algebra I is designed to develop the student’s proficiency with mathematical skills using the real number system. The course will enlarge mathematical vocabulary and enable the student to acquire the facility to apply algebraic concepts and skills and to use them in deductive reasoning and problem solving.

113 Algebra I Pre-AP

Prerequisite: department approval. Algebra I is designed to develop the student’s proficiency with mathematical skills using the real number system. The course will enlarge mathematical vocabulary and enable the student to acquire the facility to apply algebraic concepts and skills and to use them in deductive reasoning and problem solving. As an honors course, each area will be covered in greater detail than in Algebra I.

122 Algebra II

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry. Algebra II covers the structure of the real number system and the complex number system. The concepts of functions are further developed including linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Stress is placed on developing deductive reasoning abilities and precision of language in communications. Students will be given a foundation for future studies in mathematical, scientific, business, and technical fields. Summer math enrichment assignment required.

123 Algebra II Pre-AP

Prerequisite: Algebra I Pre-AP, Geometry, and department approval. The Algebra II Pre-AP course is basically the same course content as the Algebra II course; however, it is a course for the student who is gifted mathematically. Therefore, the subject areas that are covered will provide greater depth and also greater challenge. Summer math enrichment assignment required.

132 Geometry

Prerequisite: Algebra I. Geometry is designed to provide each student with knowledge of the basic principles, postulates, and theorems of Euclidean geometry. Each student will learn to write a proof, read figures, draw three-dimensional shapes and apply algebraic concepts to geometric problems. Students will also apply the concepts learned to real life applications and problems. Summer math enrichment assignment required.

133 Geometry Pre-AP

Prerequisite: Algebra I and department approval. Geometry (Pre-AP) is the study of the postulates and theorems set down by Euclid. Applications of these principles are shown by the student’s ability to read figures and to write proofs. The course provides an in-depth study of the deductive method of reasoning and abstract thinking. The course includes plane, solid, and coordinate geometry. Summer math enrichment assignment required.

141 Pre-Calculus

Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry or concurrent enrollment in Geometry. The Pre-Calculus course is a study of functions, which includes periodic, composite, and inverse functions, as well as polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Trigonometry is an integral part of the course. Sequences and series, matrices, and probability are studied in the fourth quarter. Summer math enrichment assignment required.

142 Pre-Calculus Pre-AP

Prerequisite: Algebra II (Pre-AP), Geometry or concurrent enrollment in Geometry, and department approval. The Pre-Calculus Pre-AP course is designed for the advanced mathematics student. The study of functions is extended and more attention is given to analytic geometry. Trigonometry is an integral part of this course, which will also contain material on limits and continuity. Summer math enrichment assignment required.

143 Calculus

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus. Calculus covers such topics as a Pre-Calculus review, limits and continuity, derivatives, and integration. It is a transitional class between high school mathematics and the courses students will encounter in college. Students enrolled in this class are not eligible to take the AP exam in May. Summer math enrichment assignment required.

144 Calculus (AB) AP

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Pre-AP and department approval. This Calculus course covers such topics as limits of a function and continuity, infinite series, convergence and divergence, slope functions, concepts and skills of the differentiation and integration, special functions such as trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions, and extensive applications to the physical sciences and other disciplines. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the AP Calculus AB exam in May. Summer math enrichment assignment required.

145 Statistics AP

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus (may be concurrent). This course covers material found in a one-semester introductory college course in statistics. Emphasis is placed on analyzing, collecting, and drawing conclusions from data. Ideas and calculations presented in this course have immediate connections with real-world current events. Successful completion of this course prepares students for the AP Statistics exam in May.

146 Calculus (BC) AP

Prerequisites: Calculus (AP) AB and a score of 3 or higher on AP exam. This course continues the study of limits, integral calculus, and differential equations. The topics are expanded to include derivatives of parametric equations, Euler’s Method, slope fields, and infinite series.

Science

222 Chemistry I

Prerequisite: Algebra I. Chemistry I is a laboratory-oriented course that focuses on the scientific method and the importance of precise and accurate measurements. The course includes discussion of inorganic matter, chemical formulas, the mole concept, chemical reactions, atomic structure, chemical bonding and an introduction to organic chemistry.

223 Chemistry I Pre-AP

Prerequisite: Algebra I and department approval. This course teaches the structure and properties of matter, with a focus on inorganic chemistry. Topics include colligative properties, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Advanced subjects include elementary thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Laboratory work includes an introduction to AP Chemistry labs.

224 Physics Modeling

In this course, students will develop mathematical models by examining the results of their laboratory experiments. The models developed will be deployed in problem solving. Group discussions will help students achieve depth of understanding. Frequent student presentations help promote understanding, organization, and communication skills. Emphasis will be on mechanics, including linear motion, force, energy, projectiles, circular motion, and interactions.

225 Physics Modeling Pre-AP

Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry Pre-AP, concurrent enrollment in Algebra II, and department approval. Modeling Physics Pre-AP is an 11th grade course which offers a more advanced level of experiences in the mathematical models. Many of the concepts are the same as those in Modeling Physics, except the presentation is more accelerated and in more detail. This class prepares students for enrollment in future AP science classes.

232 Biology I

Biology I includes information on the various biological disciplines including zoology, bacteriology, botany, physiology, and anatomy. Stressed in the course is the “how and why” things work. Students are introduced to proper lab techniques and scientific nomenclature. Laboratory work includes comparative and virtual dissections of various animals.

233 Biology I Pre-AP

The course will cover all of the topics stressed in general biology, as well as a number of additional labs and writing assignments. Each semester the Pre-AP students will be assigned a project (PowerPoint/research paper) focusing on genetics, microbiology, medical technology, medicine, or biochemistry. Summer enrichment assignment required.

242 Anatomy and Physiology

Prerequisite: Algebra I, Biology I, and Chemistry I. Anatomy and Physiology is an advanced course in biology. Previous study in biology will be assumed. Major emphasis is on the anatomy and physiology of the human with patho-physiological studies included. Laboratory work includes extensive dissecting of individual animal organs.

243 Chemistry II AP

Prerequisite: Algebra II, Chemistry I, concurrent enrollment in Pre-calculus and department approval. Chemistry II is a continuation of Chemistry I and further develops laboratory techniques, the scientific method, and the mathematical modeling of matter’s behavior. The course includes molecular structure, kinetic theory, the states of matter, energy and entropy, chemical equilibrium, acid-base relationships, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. Coursework culminates in the AP Chemistry exam. Summer enrichment assignment required.

244 Biology AP

Prerequisite: Chemistry I, Biology I, Algebra II, and department approval. The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory course taken by biology majors during their first year of college. Primary emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the concepts of molecular biology, heredity, evolution, and populations. The course involves extensive laboratory work and preparation for the AP Biology exam. Summer enrichment assignment required.

255 Physics I AP

Prerequisite: Chemistry I, Biology I, Algebra II, and concurrent enrollment in Pre-Calculus. Physics AP is a course designed for students who wish to pursue a career in engineering, medicine, or another science. Emphasis is placed on understanding the concepts of mechanics, gravity, periodic wave motion, and heat. Laboratory work provides a “hands on” understanding of the physics phenomena studied. Coursework culminates in the AP Physics exam. Summer enrichment assignment required.

254 AP Physics C-Mechanics

Prerequisite: Chemistry I, Biology I, Modeling Physics Pre-AP, and concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus BC. AP Physics C-Mechanics is a course designed for students who wish to pursue a career in engineering, medicine, or another science. Emphasis is placed on understanding the concepts of mechanics. Methods of calculus are used in formulating physical principles and applying them to physical problems. Laboratory work provides a “hands on” understanding of the physics phenomena studied. Coursework culminates in the AP Physics C-Mechanics exam. Summer enrichment assignment required.

240 Environmental Science

Environmental Science focuses on Earth’s natural systems and how they interrelate, particularly current environmental problems both natural and human-made, and the risks associated with these problems, and possible solutions for resolving or preventing them. Sustainable practices that enable continued development as well as conservation of Earth’s natural capital are researched and discussed.

Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Scientific principles along with economic and cultural factors influence environmental decisions. In lab, students will actively engage in the process of science, collecting data, studying multiple lines of evidence and using their analysis of the evidence and data as a basis for recommending environmental decisions. GIS will be used as a powerful tool for organizing, visualizing, and analyzing scientific data, as well as a rich source of evidence from existing databases. Students do not need to have prior experience with GIS.

248 Environmental Science AP

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them.

Social Studies

312 World Geography

World Geography examines the following areas: The five themes of geography, earth-sun relationships, physical geography, human and environmental geography, and the interactions of physical and cultural environments. Technology and computer mapping will be major aspects of this course.

313 World Geography Pre-AP

Prerequisite: department approval. Pre-AP World Geography examines the same five themes of geography as the World Geography class, but added emphasis is placed on preparation for the AP World History class. Students are more involved in GIS projects, and analytical thinking is utilized more. This class utilizes computer mapping and other application skills. Students in this course are introduced to AP style free-response questions and critical thinking skills. Summer enrichment assignment required.

322 World History

This introductory survey course traces the evolutionary development of man from earliest historic times through the twentieth century. This course follows the guidelines from the World History Association, emphasizing globalization and the interaction between the world’s various cultures and regions. Appropriate emphasis will be placed on the development and application of basic social studies skills.

324 World History AP

Prerequisite: department approval. AP World History is a college-level survey that de-emphasizes European history and incorporates more global trends. Students are expected to master critical thinking skills and argumentative writing, as well as document analysis. Emphasis is placed on the AP curriculum in preparation for the AP test in May. Students will be expected to learn and master computer application programs and mapping technology. Students are expected to participate in class discussions, debates, and in-class presentations. The reading and writing expectations of this course are extensive, and the class is very fast-paced. Summer enrichment assignment required.

332 U.S. History

This course is a survey of America from pre-Columbian times to the present. The primary emphasis is on the development of the Republic from the Revolution onward, and the emergence of the United States as a world power. Attention will be given to American social and cultural history as well as to political and economic development and international events. Appropriate emphasis will be placed on the development and application of basic social studies skills.

333 U.S. History AP

Prerequisite: department approval. This course is a comprehensive survey of United States history from 1492 to the present. Emphasis is placed on the AP curriculum in preparation for the AP test in May. Students are expected to expand on computer and mapping skills learned in the previous two years, as well as learning statistical analysis. Document analysis will be reinforced, as the AP U.S. test is characteristically different from the AP World History test. More emphasis will be placed on historic details than in previous years, as well as integrating those details into historic arguments. Summer enrichment assignment required.

334 European History AP

Prerequisite: instructor approval. This course covers European history from 1450 to the present. Students will explore the political, social, cultural, and economic trends in Europe which led to European supremacy in the nineteenth century, leading to the wars of the twentieth century, culminating in the Cold War and the fall of Communism. Emphasis is placed on the AP curriculum in preparation for the AP test in May.

335 Human Geography AP

Prerequisite: department approval. AP Human Geography is an 11th and 12th grade year-long course in preparation for the AP Human Geography exam. Students in this course will learn about world population issues, border disputes, and international conflicts. Students are exposed to economic theories and models as well as world religions and the origins and diffusion of languages. They also study urban development, industrialization, and city planning. The AP Human Geography student will explore topics ranging from farming to pandemic disease. Summer enrichment assignment required.

340 U.S. Government

Semester Course: 12th Grade. This course is an introduction to both the foundations and development of the American political system and the structure and functions of the American governmental systems at the federal, state, and local levels. Students will be expected to utilize technical, linguistic, and historical skills learned in previous years.

341 U.S. Government AP

Prerequisite: department approval. Semester Course: 12th Grade. AP Government is an intense, one semester examination of the institutions of the American political system and their development. Students will gain an analytical perspective of the United States Government and its various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas. Student presentations and research involving the use of technology are an integral part of the course. A major project is required twice per semester. Emphasis is placed on the AP curriculum in preparation for the AP test in May. Summer enrichment assignment required.

342 Economics

Semester Course: 12th Grade. This course is a basic introduction to economics with primary emphasis on the characteristics and working of the market system underlying American free enterprise capitalism. The course will focus on the three primary economic systems, participation of the consumer in the American economic system, and a debate over the increasing influence of government as the public sector in the American economy.

343 Economics AP

Prerequisite: department approval. Semester Course: 12th Grade. AP Economics is an intense look at Macro and Micro economics. Students will cover an extensive amount of material concerning economic systems and personal economics, emphasizing the American free enterprise system. The course will emphasize the nature and function of product markets and the principles of economics that apply to an economy as a whole. Summer enrichment assignment required.

348 Macroeconomics AP

This course examines the economic system as a whole. The course places special emphasis on the study of national income, price level determination, economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. The goals for the class are four-fold: to increase the students' understanding of the American economic system – output, unemployment and inflation; to use graphic representation to explain economic events; to apply monetary and fiscal policy to counteract economic problems; and to gain sufficient understanding, analytical skill and problem solving ability to pass the AP test for university credit.

349 General Linguistics

11th and 12th Grade: Fall Semester. This semester-long course introduces the basic components of the scientific study of language: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. From that foundation, students will discuss and investigate a variety of other intriguing linguistic topics, including how language interacts with the mind, social class, gender, history, and world view. Students will continue to develop critical thinking skills through evaluating language as scientific data and discussing their conclusions in a real-world context. This college-style course is designed to explore the fundamental notion that the study of language is the study of what it means to be human.

America in The 1960s

Semester Course. The purpose of this course is to learn the details and the significance of prominent individuals, movements, cultures, and events throughout the decade of 1960s in the United States. Students will learn how and why historical events from the beginning to the end of the decade are important to the history of the nation and have had an effect in the formation of today’s United States. Topics covered include: a brief study of the 1950s; JFK’s life, presidency and assassination; the Civil Rights movement; the presidency Lyndon Johnson; the Vietnam War; the Counter Culture; and music of the 1960s.

Technology

702 Video Production

Semester Course. Video Production is a project-based video curriculum that develops career and communication skills in video production using mainly Adobe tools from the Adobe Master Collection of software, including Adobe Premiere Pro and Adobe Encore. The curriculum adopted for this course is published by Adobe and develops knowledge in storytelling, capturing and editing video and audio, and finalizing content for DVD or web through emphasis on design, project management, and video technology. Each project builds on lessons previously learned. This digital video curriculum aligns with the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for Students.

706 Auto CAD

Prerequisite: concurrently enrolled or completion of Pre-Calculus and Modeling Physics, Physics, or Engineering. Recommended for students in Grades 11-12. This course will provide students the opportunity to master computer software applications, such as Computer Animated Design (CAD), in a variety of engineering and technical fields. This course further develops the process of engineering through and application of the design process.

718 Graphic Design

Prerequisite: Intro to Art I. Semester Course. Graphic Design is a foundation graphics course utilizing computer media with an emphasis on design elements and principles. Typography, illustration, digital imaging, and manipulation of images will be covered. In addition to technical skills, an exploration of creative thinking, problem solving, and critical analysis will be studied. Students will be encouraged to develop an expression of individual style. In addition to technical skills, an exploration of creative thinking, problem solving, and critical analysis will be studied. Students will be encouraged to develop an expression of individual style. This is a sophomore, junior, and senior level course and may be used as a technology or art credit.

720 Graphic Design II

Prerequisite: Graphic Design I. Semester Course. The core emphasis of this course covers the history of typography, an introduction to page layout design (both for print and online environments), as well as a study of influential designers. Strong emphasis is placed on the history of type and the technical, problem-solving and aesthetic use of display and text type. Through lectures, demonstrations, and studio work, students are introduced to the creative thinkers, important innovations, and breakthrough technologies that have shaped the evolution of visual communication. Creative thinking is encouraged, along with prescribed techniques and media. This is a sophomore, junior, and senior level course.

723 Web Design

Semester Course. The Web Design course is a hands-on elective designed to challenge both novice and Web savvy students alike. The focus will be on gaining an understanding of the various programming languages and platforms used on the Web; original content creations using various Adobe programs including Dreamweaver, Flash, Fireworks, Illustrator, Photoshop, and Freehand; the basic elements of Internet protocol; Web server software; formatting of pages; file and folder management; etiquette and copyright guidelines; developing a specific purpose and goal for the site; and ultimately the publishing of Web site projects on the Internet for public view. This course is also offered for college credit through the Mountain View College Dual Credit program as IMED 1416.6280.

724 Graphics/Animation

Prerequisite: Students must have knowledge of basic computing skills and file management skills. Semester Course. In Graphics and Animation, students will develop graphics and animation using a variety of software and digital tools. Through group and independent projects students will design and edit original graphics and animation using strong design concepts learned in the course. Concepts include an understanding of composition and lighting, use of different animation techniques, optimization of a variety of image types, and the creation of 2D and 3D effects. With a focus on developing original content creations, students will use various Adobe software programs including Flash, Fireworks, Illustrator, Photoshop, and Macromedia Freehand to create projects for publication in a variety of formats including Web-based, rich media applications, video, and printed materials.

725 Computer Science - Beginning Robotics

Semester Course. Students will learn the foundations of robotics and how they are used in the modern world today. Upon completion of the course, the successful student should have an understanding of robotics and engineering design and their use in everyday life, and the ability to safely apply these concepts in the laboratory.

726 Gaming

Semester Course. Gaming is a hands-on elective designed to challenge both novice and computer savvy students alike. The course curriculum concentrates mainly on the development of casual games using the MIT program Scratch and Adobe’s Flash. The focus will be on gaining an understanding of the various programming languages and platforms used for developing casual 2D games; the basic elements of scripted actions; Flash AS2 and AS3; file and folder management; etiquette and copyright guidelines; developing an understanding of both casual and complex gaming; and ultimately the publishing of finished games for posting on the Internet and for public play.

727 Computer Science - Advanced Robotics

Semester Course. Students will build upon the foundations from the Beginning Robotics class. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to design, test, and refine a number of robots and understand the use of robotics in daily life. Students will also mentor beginning robotics classes.

728 Crime Fighting with GIS

Semester Course. In this course students will learn the fundamentals of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) or advanced computer mapping software by working directly with law enforcement. Students work hand-in-hand with the Dallas Police, as well as other agencies to prepare weekly and monthly crime reports, work on search and rescue mapping cases, and generate homeland security projects. Upon the completion of this course, students will not only know about GIS, GPS, and other geospatial technologies, they will also know what it means to directly impact their community by helping to safeguard citizens.

707 College GIS I

This is a basic to intermediate level course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) operations, including mapping spatial analysis, 3D modeling and engineering trigonometry. Students will also learn ways in which GIS is used in different fields including business, government, and scientific analysis. This will be a challenging class that is a combination of three college courses (GISC 1411, 1125, 1145) taught through the Brookhaven College GeoTechnology Institute. Students completing this year-long double blocked class will meet every day for 6 hours of college credit that directly articulates with both an Associate’s and Bachelor’s degree in GIS.

708 College GIS II

Prerequisites: College GIS I. This is an advanced level Geographic Information Systems (GIS) course that teaches the principles of cartography (map design), global positioning systems (GPS) and raster (pixel) based analysis. This is a challenging class that combines two classes taught through the Brookhaven College GeoTechnology Institute (GISC 1401 &1421) for 8 hours of college credit. The course will either be taught at Brookhaven College with students traveling to Brookhaven or at Bishop Dunne as a double blocked class that meets every day.

618 Yearbook

The Yearbook course at Bishop Dunne is an elective course that works toward the completion and selling of a large finished, printed product, which provides students with marketable experience in journalism, photography, digital image editing, and print media publishing. In class, students compose and edit all elements of the project, including formatted text, layout, graphic art, and digital photography. Students are assigned or elected to certain duties as well as pages in the book and must meet all deadlines imposed by the project manager or adviser. The course covers many of the content standards and objectives encountered in English courses, graphic arts, business, and computer technology courses. Students will learn journalism techniques, including layout and design, writing and editing copy, headlines and picture captions, interviewing and reporting, and photography. Students will learn proofing strategies and work together to agree on the book’s theme and layout. At times, deadlines may require that staff members work after school, on weekends, and holidays.

Theology

911 Theology I

The freshmen course of study focuses on the Bible and the mystery of Jesus Christ. In addition to a practical examination of the construction of the Bible, its content, and how to read it, the course examines the Catholic Church’s understanding of Revelation, Inspiration, God’s salvific plan, and of Jesus Christ as the second person of the Trinity. Through the study of the Bible, students will come to know Jesus as Incarnation, the living Word of God, our real-life example of God’s path to salvation.

921 Theology II

The sophomore course of study focuses on the Paschal Mystery of Christ and what it means to be the Church. Students will focus on Jesus’ redemptive power seen through his life, death and resurrection, and how we, who share in Jesus’ redemptive power, can be shaped by it, and, in turn, are called to shape the world. Students will study the Church, its origin, its structure, the Marks of the Church, and its mission, and come to understand why belonging to, why “being Church” is essential.

931 Theology III

The junior course of study focuses on the sacraments and morality. Students will study each of the seven sacraments and understand them as means to encounter Jesus in their lives. Students will also learn moral concepts and precepts that govern the lives of Christ’s disciples.

944 Theology IV – World Religions

Senior theology is divided into two semester-long courses: Senior Service and Senior Synthesis. Senior Service is the student’s opportunity to understand and embody the role of service in their Christian life. The in-class study will focus on the Church’s Principles of Catholic Social Teachings, and these principles will be put into practice twice each week through service to the Dallas community. Senior Synthesis is an attempt to synthesize the material covered the three previous years at Bishop Dunne, but from a more adult perspective and a more ecumenical perspective. faith, knowledge, belief, and their relation to each other, God, Jesus, the scriptures, suffering and death, are the topics synthesized in a manner to help us better understand what it means to be human.

World Language

511 French I

French I introduces students to French language and cultures through the use of varied activities that develop contemporary conversational, reading and writing skills. Using material created especially for today’s young students, French is made accessible, relevant, and engaging, while students learn the basic elements of the language through the text, workbook, videos, audios, and other multimedia material.

512 French II

Prerequisite: French I. French II builds on the foundation established in French I by expanding vocabulary, grammatical, reading, writing and speaking knowledge, and skills. Pronunciation is increasingly stressed at this level, along with more detailed examination of the French language and culture based on the same textbook and related multimedia material used in French I.

570 French II Pre-AP

Prerequisite: 85% or higher in French I or IB, teacher approval. French II Pre-AP continues to build on skills established in French I (or a combination of IA and IB) with even greater emphasis on more sophisticated grammatical and vocabulary skills with the intent of preparing students for the AP French Exam. The class will emphasize oral and writing proficiency and comprehension of authentic written and auditory materials. Students will use the same textbook series and workbooks used in French I and II, but these materials will be supplemented by coordinated videos, audios, and other authentic multimedia material. Students will participate in in-depth, independent projects. Summer enrichment assignment required.

513 French III

Prerequisite: French II. French III continues to build on skills established in French I and II with even greater emphasis on more sophisticated grammatical and vocabulary skills. The same textbook series and workbooks used in French I and II are supplemented by coordinated videos, audios, and other multimedia material.

568 French III Pre-AP

Prerequisite: 85% or higher in French II, instructor approval. French III Pre-AP continues to build on skills established in French I and II with even greater emphasis on more sophisticated grammatical and vocabulary skills with the intent of preparing students for the AP French exam. The class will emphasize oral and writing proficiency and comprehension of authentic written and auditory materials. Students will use the same textbook series and workbooks used in French I, 1A and 1B, but these materials will be supplemented by coordinated videos, audios, and other authentic multimedia material. Students will participate in in-depth, independent projects. Summer enrichment assignment required.

514 French Language AP

Prerequisite: French III and instructor approval. French Language AP features several new grammar structures, but focuses more on using and adding to structures that have already been studied. Classroom instruction will balance the four pillars of language: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The class will be conducted entirely in French, and students are required to utilize French in all conversations. The French Language AP Exam will be taken at the end of the course. Summer enrichment assignment required.

517 French IV

Prerequisite: French III and instructor approval. French IV is an advanced French course for students who wish to further develop the writing, speaking, reading, and listening skills they acquired in French III. Accuracy and fluency in these four target areas will be emphasized through the study of grammar, vocabulary, and culture. Students are challenged to use French language skills in a total immersion situation. This course will also prepare students for a College Placement exam in French language.

521 Spanish I

As a beginning course for college-bound students, Spanish I seeks to develop fundamental skills in the four basic areas of language: speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. It includes an introduction to the culture of the Spanish-speaking world.

522 Spanish II

Prerequisite: Spanish I. Spanish II continues the development of skills in all four areas of language, as well as cultural studies in the native language.

523 Spanish III

Prerequisite: Spanish II. Continuing the study of culture as well as the development of skills in all four areas of language, Spanish III seeks to prepare the student for achievement tests for advanced placement in college.

524 Spanish IV

Prerequisite: Spanish III or III Pre-AP. Spanish IV is a total immersion Spanish course for students who wish to further develop the writing, speaking, reading, and listening skills they acquired in Spanish III. Accuracy and fluency in these four target areas will be emphasized through the study of grammar, vocabulary, and culture. This course will also prepare students for a College Placement exam in Spanish language.

544 Spanish III Pre-AP

Prerequisite: Spanish II Pre-AP and instructor approval. This course is designed for the serious students of Spanish who wish to develop their proficiency in the language skills, but who need to work towards the mastery of those language skills. The content of this course will reflect the intellectual interests shared by the students and teacher (the arts, history, current events, literature, culture, sports, etc.) and will encompass both formal and informal language styles. Summer enrichment assignment required.

545 Spanish Language AP

Prerequisite: Spanish III Pre-AP, Spanish IV, or Advanced Spanish Conversation, and instructor approval. Spanish Language AP is intended for students who wish to develop their proficiency in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Course content may best reflect intellectual interests shared by the students and teacher (the arts, history, current events, literature, culture, sports, etc.). The course seeks to develop language skills that are useful in themselves and that can be applied to various activities and disciplines rather than to the mastery of any specific subject matter. This study will culminate with the student sitting for the AP Spanish Language exam in May. Summer enrichment assignment required.

546 Spanish Literature AP

Prerequisite: Spanish III Pre-AP, Spanish IV, or Advanced Spanish Conversation, and instructor approval. Spanish Literature AP covers selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. The function of the course is to prepare students to understand a lecture in Spanish and to participate actively in discussions on literary topics in Spanish. The student will learn to analyze critically the form and content of literary works orally and in writing using appropriate terminology. This study will culminate with the student sitting for the AP Spanish Literature exam in May. Summer enrichment assignment required.

547 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture

Prerequisite: Spanish III Pre-AP, Spanish IV, or Spanish AP Language/Literature, and instructor approval. This is a year-long credit course for those students who wish to pursue a study of Spanish communication skills beyond the advanced Pre-AP or AP levels. The Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture course builds upon the vocabulary and grammar skills acquired in Spanish I Pre-AP, II Pre-AP, and III Pre-AP, and Spanish IV, but emphasizes the practical application of these skills in oral communication. Students will be required to participate entirely in Spanish, and discussions will focus on literary and artistic analysis, cultural events, history and politics, travel, and many other relevant subjects and issues. Seniors have the option of substituting one semester of the course with a Spanish-language Senior Service assignment for which reflection essays would be written in Spanish.

551 Spanish I Pre-AP

Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This first course is designed to build upon fundamental listening and speaking capabilities of students. The course will also develop and increase underlying skills in reading, spelling, and writing competency and creativity while improving overall language skills for use with mass communication and daily life situations. Summer enrichment assignment required.

552 Spanish II Pre-AP

Prerequisite: Spanish I Pre-AP and instructor approval. This second course is designed to build upon the fundamental listening and speaking capabilities that were strengthened in Spanish I Honors. The course will also further develop and increase the underlying skills that were augmented in reading, spelling, and writing competency and creativity while improving even further overall language skills for use with mass communication and daily life situations. Summer enrichment assignment required.

547 Christian Service - Spanish Language

Prerequisite: Spanish III Pre-AP, Spanish IV, or Spanish AP Language/Literature, and instructor approval. This is a one-semester or two-semester course with the Theology and World Languages departments that combines the required semester-long Senior Service class (see the full Course Description in Theology) with an optional semester-long Spanish conversation course. Students would spend one semester completing their Senior Service assignment at a venue wherein they would be required to communicate in Spanish. All Senior Service reflection essays would be written in Spanish. Seniors could then opt to spend the second semester in the Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture classroom. The Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture course builds upon the vocabulary and grammar skills acquired in Spanish I, II, and III, but emphasizes the practical application of these skills in oral communication. Students will be required to participate entirely in Spanish, and discussions will focus on literary and artistic analysis, cultural events, history and politics, travel, and many other relevant subjects and issues.

530 Latin I

Latin I is an introductory course designed to guide each student toward mastery of the Latin language with the added benefits of reinforcing English grammar skills and providing a sound foundation for further language studies. Approximately 60% of English words derive from Latin, including most every difficult word found on the grammar, reading, and writing portions of the SAT and ACT. Students of Latin will begin to master the art of recognizing Latin roots in English words, and understanding how to guess at the meanings of unfamiliar English vocabulary. In addition, students will develop an understanding and appreciation for ancient Roman culture and its influence on the modern world.

532 Latin II

Prerequisite: Latin I. A continuing study of the more complex elements of Latin grammar, vocabulary and syntax, Latin II develops the student’s ability to read and understand original Latin, while continuing the study of Imperial Rome in the first through third centuries A.D.

533 Latin II Pre-AP

Prerequisite: instructor approval. This course is recommended for high achieving Latin I students who are interested in a more detailed approach to the language. This accelerated course moves the student rapidly into lengthy passages of Latin, preparing the student for further study along the Pre-AP and AP track. Grammar and syntax continue to be stressed as key components of language mastery.

534 Latin III

Prerequisite: Latin II. A continuation of the study of the complex elements of Latin grammar, advanced Latin places emphasis on reading excerpts from Cicero, Horace, and Pliny and introduces the student to stylistic devices and Latin poetry including Ovid’s Metamorphoses, the poems of Catullus, and Vergil’s Aeneid.

535 Latin III Pre-AP

Prerequisite: Latin II Pre-AP and instructor approval. This accelerated course is the precursor to AP Latin, and, as such, requires the student to master the complex elements of Latin grammar while moving to readings in Latin from the prominent authors in Latin literature. In addition to selections from authors such as Ovid, Cicero, Vergil, and Horace, students will read several poems of the 1st Century B.C. lyric poet Catullus and be introduced to the social and historical context of his work.

537 Latin (Vergil) AP

Prerequisites: Latin III Pre-AP and instructor approval. AP Latin is an enjoyable, fun and challenging course designed for highly motivated students who have mastered the complex elements of Latin grammar covered in the first three years. Applying this mastery, students will experience the joy and satisfaction of reading one of the finest authors in the canon of Western literature in his own words, not in translation, while learning about the famously tumultuous atmosphere of 1st century B.C. Rome. This study will culminate with the student sitting for the AP Latin exam in May. Summer enrichment assignment required.

539 Latin V H

Prerequisite: AP Latin IV: Vergil. This college-level course explores “Golden Age” Latin literature beyond the current AP: Vergil syllabus, with students reading selections from authors such as Horace, Ovid, Catullus, and Cicero. Students will be expected to demonstrate mastery of Latin grammar as well as recognition of several poetic meters and rhetorical figures. The course also demands high-level literary analysis, both in discussion and essay writing.

507 Russian I

In this beginners’ Russian language course, students will learn the Cyrillic alphabet and the fundamentals of Russian pronunciation. Students will acquire knowledge of the language through the use of varied activities that develop contemporary conversational, reading and writing skills. The course also provides an introduction to modern Russian culture.

508 Russian II

Russian II builds on the foundation established in Russian I by expanding vocabulary, grammatical, reading, writing and speaking knowledge and skills. This course will stress detailed examination of the Russian Language and culture based on multimedia material used in Russian I. Students will acquire additional proficiency and fluency in speaking, reading, and writing Russian in practical situations.

509 Russian III

This course further develops skills learned in Russian II, with an emphasis on acquiring more advanced writing, speaking, reading, and listening skills. Accuracy in these four target areas will be emphasized through the study of grammar, vocabulary, and culture. Students will read passages from Russian literature while also learning practical uses of Russian for conversational purposes.

548 Advanced Russian Conversation and Culture

Prerequisite: Russian III and instructor approval. This course is designed for the serious students of Russian who wish to pursue a study of Russian communication skills beyond the Russian III level. The Advanced Russian Conversation and Culture course builds upon the vocabulary and grammar skills acquired in Russian I, II, and III, but emphasizes the practical application of these skills in oral communication. The content of this course will reflect travel, history, current events, literature, culture, sports, etc. Students will read books, write essays and make presentations in Russian.